Two Paths: You Only Die Once

“Everything in my head felt so heavy and enmeshed that I was never any good at talking or at being in touch with myself to be able to let it all out. There was like a fear inside me that if I opened up just a crack, I would completely crumble, fall apart to such an extent that I wouldn’t be able to get back up again.”
– Georgie Massiot

When I finished and first began reading Two Paths: You Only Die Once, what struck was how author, Georgie Massiot bluntly states that they aren’t a writer. It’s one of less drastic part of the book and maybe one that you’ll gloss over or see as meaningless, but it’s one that pushed me to think. I think it’s important Georgie Massiot or anyone to know, that if you maintain the power to tell your story and publish it for the world to judge, you’re a writer.

That being said, I’ve realized how difficult it is to review books about real life experiences that people go though. Especially when the experiences are mostly adverse. I’ve witness countless reviewers, unable to truly justify whether reading someones life story is inspirational or interesting to them, so they judge the writing in place of the topic. While the written aspect of a novel is important, I think that confronting the topic is more so when you’re reading someone life story. Not to judge but rather to reflect on. It’s easy to judge whether something is well written or not, but acknowledging what words made you feel, in place of how they’re presented, has a greater affect in my eyes.

“Questions were running through my own mind. I didn’t feel happy inside, in fact, I couldn’t feel anything anymore. My life was feeling numb and disengaged. I guess the panic feeling I’d had was also because I had felt some embarrassment that I was still not much further forward with this big fencing dream that everyone, except me, had made so big and public.”

– Georgie Massiot

Two Paths: You Only Die Once, discusses excruciating topics. Georgie Massiot, passionately revels the traumatic abusive underlining of their childhood and offers readers previews of different points in their life. Georgie’s life story wasn’t one sided or just directed at one thing. It confronted many different things, people and outlined mistakes and hardships that have allowed Georgie to grow despite their deprivation; and allowed me to reflect on as a reader. Personally, I found Georgie’s writing heartfelt, strong, and emotional. Georgie really has a way with words. While some may feel like a dagger in your heart, “Sometimes, most of the time, I just felt like I was suffocating in a vortex of just stuff, hurtful, painful, abusive stuff, desperately trying to hold on to this new life that had been given to me like a gift.” Others will make you laugh and smile, “”I’m a little bit stuck,” I said, hanging almost upside down, head first into the direction of a toilet. The old fashioned window was small and its latch had latched onto my jeans. My friends through their tears of laughter managed to unhook my butt and I disappeared completely.”

“Everything in my head felt so heavy and enmeshed that I was never any good at talking or at being in touch with myself to be able to let it all out. There was like a fear inside me that if I opened up just a crack, I would completely crumble, fall apart to such an extent that I wouldn’t be able to get back up again.”

– Georgie Massiot

Georgie’s ability to move me without lingering on a subject for too long, is another reason they’re powerful. What I really enjoyed was getting to know Georgie through their words. I understand that this wasn’t intentionally done, however, it’s important that I acknowledge it. Even in times when Georgie might have felt defeated due to their own actions, they took responsibility for them and tried. I think trying is important. When you’re stuck in abusive, spastic surroundings, you stop trying and lose parts of yourself. While that did happen to Georgie, I also witnessed development, power, and a refusal to surcome to the surroundings around them.

It was hard for me to put this book down. It was also hard for me to read what Georgie went through. No one should be subjected to the amounts of pain and trauma that Georgie went through. I’m happy Georgie had the courage to go through these traumatic experiences, even though at times it didn’t seem possible, and then write it down. I hope those whom have hurt Georgie read their words and realize while they’ve hurt them they didn’t brake them. They’ve allowed them to grow and given them the chance to encounter wonderful people that will read these words and love them in ways that they should’ve never had a chance too.

“Someone once described grief as an ocean of emotion in which you learn to swim and become a stronger swimmer, as the varying sized waves come in and take your knees out from behind you.”

– Georgie Massiot

When I review books like Two Paths: You Only Die Once, I like to point out parts of the book that meant something to me, as well as parts of the book that allowed me to get to know the author. It helps to understand what I’m reading better and understand the author in my in way. It is my hope that reading parts of Two Paths: You Only Die Once, that were meaningful to me, will encourage you to find parts that are mean something for you as well.

29511359_186315198646750_4804008243360882691_nReviewed by:
 Josie M. Hulen

Josie Monet Hulen is a writer with a Bachelors degree in literature. She’s passionate about the written word and often spends her time with her nose in a book or in the middle of writing one. Her hunger for knowledge and determination to learn, landed her a job as an office manager. She has also been an intern for 9 months with an online publishing company and works part time as a freelance writer. Josie one day hopes to be an inspiring writer.

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